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The blacklist allows a block producer to ignore transactions coming from specific accounts. Is it possible to see which BPs blacklist which accounts?

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It is not possible to see the full blacklist, however there are some methods of partially/semi achieving this:

  1. You can check if you are on the blacklist for a BP by executing a transaction whilst the specific BP is producing blocks, if you are on the blacklist, you will see the error message: Error 3130002: Authorizing actor of transaction is on the blacklist Error Details: authorizing actor(s) in transaction are on the actor blacklist: ["myaccount"]
  2. Some BPs keep a transparent blacklist online, you can then check that list. However this relies on the BPs telling the truth.
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    noob question: what are the reasons why a bp don't tell the truth? – mixdev Jul 20 '19 at 8:26
  • I'm not saying they don't tell the truth, but how can you know for sure? – Phillip Hamnett - EOS42 Jul 20 '19 at 14:10
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Just an addition to phillip's answer:

The original black list entries are on-chain. Please check https://bloks.io/blacklist to find what accounts are in the blacklist. Also can see the SHA256 hash of the blacklist config. However, many BPs have modified the list to add to block many newer accounts since ECAF is not maintained anymore. Here's on example of updated blacklist from EOS NY

One way to confirm this is really the blacklist the bp is using is by computing the hash of this file yourself and compare it with what the BP has publicised (in the blacklist table above).

curl -sL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/eosnewyork/eoslists/master/blacklist.ini | grep -v '#' | sort | uniq | tr -d " " | shasum -a 256 | awk '{print $1}'

Which apparently is 1adf65d8d9272f1634240a0e057910d5c276ede1aa96463b8ad2fa1af62e47ef, the same hash from the table.

This hash has been used by many other BPs. Here's the full list of hashes currently on-chain from top 200 BPs. Counts are the number of BPs using the same blacklist. As you can see, there are only 12 valid hashes.

[ { blacklisthash: '', count: 110 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '8a9695b16fc9223c959d7349ab64e96788d289a1e760881cbba25a96f03691b6',
    count: 26 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '1adf65d8d9272f1634240a0e057910d5c276ede1aa96463b8ad2fa1af62e47ef',
    count: 22 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '4932dc45c1eb29bdf323e29b2f0c582b2772ff207c6cf85b9e682f3bbb495154',
    count: 3 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '530dafe522171978d8ee2f96d32850ac58b6cd4d68c59e5374c9dae22784107b',
    count: 2 },
  { blacklisthash:
     'fd31f4de644cb157447536e5119ac9486c282becdbe4418ea652b3b11e05be12',
    count: 2 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000',
    count: 2 },
  { blacklisthash:
     'e3ed55685981d74e54c26c2ce995f6d56356d39634f17447939186569548dc6d',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '8b48009b983cf3ab4bb1a9657940b9aabf5a6d8f1a6514d3cc496ffadad597dd',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '6f1561d7692c02dcb9b0b69fe4073fd023623b7e333e0a9592bc81d475073068',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     'ddd51da982a55ae6422c1d96a679dc1bcf2479f9e9b988dd138b9bb7f9ec9681',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '65ace1de15ebe93b7fa59f31878ec8d83c604333fcc184f31436b0aa80324126',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '38bdf133655a3e89d3801c593f8efbf363ac2cc06af8c0a1ef6c7dacdd6adc7c',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '6dfd12b0cc2a51f98238c8ac0e540fa791ab79347cb247f51ddc8b945bce2c59',
    count: 1 },
  { blacklisthash:
     '3760d5674ae145ca748c412e269b3763c587aff3b755de14449b58c4794ca9f6',
    count: 1 } ]

Having said that there is no fool proof way to find what entries are there in a BPs blacklist unless they publicize it. However, one pointer to brute force it is to keep the (susepected) accounts in the example file and run the hash and check if it matches the hash of the bps listed hash. However, this is not guaranteed to give a match.

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  • The black lists are not on chain, only what the block producers say they put on their black lists is on chain. They can lie. Same is true for checking the hash – Phillip Hamnett - EOS42 Jan 13 at 16:02

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