7

How would users best ensure that the owner of the token didn't cheat and issue themselves additional tokens across a bunch of new accounts? This isn't really an issue, it's assumed by all involved in an airdrop that the creator isn't doing this out of benevolence. They need not cheat the system with a 'bunch of new accounts', that's a lot of unnecessary ...


5

Users of the EOS network will not require any holdings to interface with dApps. As you mentioned Airdrops are certainly a benefit of owning EOS, many companies are using this as a way to circumvent the ICO restrictions by the SEC and also by the large tech companies banning ICO advertisements. Once the Everipedia airdrops ends, there will be more, ...


4

Update 4/2019: You can use AirdropsDac vRAM enabled service: https://airdropsdac.com/ Recently they launched the Emanate token with this setup: https://medium.com/@airdropsdac/claim-your-emanate-emt-tokens-b24484e84a0e vRAM provides a caching layer for the current RAM system. It works much in the same sense as RAM and a DISK work on a normal PC. RAM is ...


4

Their goal is the keep the blockchain decentralized. Meaning they will launch their own chain with the same software, with the goal of having different block producers than the main chain. The only difference is that instead of 1 billion tokens, they'll have 5 billion tokens. Keep in mind that EOS.IO is designed to enable multiple implementations, with ...


3

Why does it seem that there are hardly any ICO for EOS projects? But there are many AirDrops on EOS? I believe there are a few aspects that led to this phenomenon: Regulatory risk. ICOs have seen quite a bit regulatory scrutiny lately, and selling/advertising securities to (non-accredited) investors can expose you to legal risks, unless you are willing to ...


3

Some airdrops like HorusPay will airdrop only to genesis block holders. That means If you had your tokens the day of the snapshot, you will get 1:1 ratio according to your eos tokens. Otherwise like said on https://www.chintai-eos.io/, your tokens are moved to a leasing contract address. That means you're not in control of your tokens while they're being ...


3

An airdrop is a free token distribution while a ICO is a fund offering in exchange of tokens. Everipedia wanted to do a ICO in order to collect funds to finance their project, then Block.One made a deal with the Everipedia team by funding their financial needs and it return they build on EOS and airdrop their tokens to eos token holders.


2

Many Chinese projects airdropped their tokens to users and they had no jurisdictional repercussions because it was distributed freely and everyone had same chances to get them. If the token got value it is mainly because users agree to give it value. Just precise the function of your token in the whitepaper and make it clear that is had no actual value. ...


2

There could be benefits yes, depending on which dApps a user might interact with. It might be possible that a dApp will require a user to stake tokens to the dApp to power it, and/or for storage, either for access, or to gain access to additional features/capacity. This will depend on the business model a particular dApp chooses to adopt of course, and ...


2

Airdropping a token distribution to a widely distributed token distribution such as EOS can be beneficial for bootstrapping a project with a community that has an interest in the project. It also allows other projects to take advantage of the anti-consolidation properties of EOS, and achieve a more optimal distribution for their own project.


2

Yes, the token is attached to the smart contract, and the smart contract is attached to an account. Whenever you transfer tokens, you have to specify the account on which the smart contract for those tokens is uploaded.


2

Technically depends on whatever smart contract you'll use for the tokens however I'll assume you're using the eosio.token contract. You can sell this RAM only if you're able to unstake it, you cannot unstake RAM if it is currently being used, it is used in the multi-index containers which each row costs a portion of RAM. In the eosio.token contract, ...


2

I don't think you can ask cleos directly for that information. I think you need to inspect the contracts that get uploaded yourself to identify them. That could be automated, of course.


1

Everipedia is the world's first encyclopedia on the blockchain,It's also the biggest english encyclopedia at present. Everipedia's IQ Network is the world's first Encyclopedia that allows anyone to become a stakeholder in the system and earn rank, rewards & tokens for curating content. I guess you can get more details from following everipedia page:...


1

For the EOSDAC airdrop we used this -> https://github.com/eosdac/DACtools/tree/master/drop%20tool It also also a nice verify function to pick up those missed transfers


1

You may try EOSDrops, it is from EOS Essentials (who made Scatter): https://github.com/EOSEssentials/EOSDrops


1

You can use one of the airdrop tools available: https://github.com/EOSEssentials/EOSDrops They do something similar to what you suggest but they optimise the process and provide a configuration interface. Edit: New tool that stores daily snapshots: https://www.eossnapshots.io/


1

An airdrop is a token that is generated on the chain. The drop can have many differences such as the amount of tokens to eos token ,e.g., 6 to 1, as well as a threshold to qualify for the drop (say holding at least 100 EOS). To generate a token, first there needs to be an account to host that token. Once that's done, the account can then push the contract ...


1

What would one normally use to iterate over all EOS addresses? Code examples maybe? How do know which EOS addresses exist and have tokens? Normally, you would download the ledger and store the accounts in a database, but you can also use https://www.eossnapshots.io/


1

Hey that's a great question. I've wondered about that myself as we launched our own Blockchain Platform (carmel.io) and it's not so much about whether you're selling the tokens or not. You could definitely sell Utility Tokens. For example, the EOS token is an utility token and they're selling them. A utility token is essentially a token that can be used for ...


1

EvolutionOS has a certain opinion on how a blockchain should be governed which is different from that of EOSIO's. For instance, it was earlier proposed by EOSIO that a token owner must lock up their tokens for a period of 6 months before they have voting power. EvolutionOS believed this to be unfair as those who have more wealth can afford to lock up their ...


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