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1) what is a stake? Staking is the process of locking your tokens for a fixed period of time. On mainnet, at the moment, this period is at least three days. 2) after making a stake, what cpu and ram gets used? it's said that after staking , you are using block producer's cpu and ram's resources. how am i using their resources at all? When you stake, you ...


6

Officially, there is no way to decide. The initial transaction is paid for by the user, all subsequent actions performed by the smart contract are paid for by the smart contract itself. As stated in the white paper: Receiver Pays Traditionally, it is the business that pays for office space, computational power, and other costs required to run the ...


5

libraries/chain/include/eosio/chain/config.hpp#L48-L49 static const uint32_t account_cpu_usage_average_window_ms = 24*60*60*1000l; static const uint32_t account_net_usage_average_window_ms = 24*60*60*1000l; I interpret this to be 1.000 day wall clock time.


5

The EOS constitution forbids to have more than 10% (total supply) eos tokens for one individual/dApp/BlockProducer. This was addressed by Thomas Cox in interview with EOS GO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQe15JHpjDA


4

How to prevent account creation abuse: Accounts require "1.5 KB". So this would be one barrier to someone massively creating accounts because they would have to pay for each account. How does deploying contract work: To deploy a contract, it requires a certain amount of RAM for the contract to persist in. You can read a very good example of how an ...


3

You can do that by simply running cleos get account youraccount, also you can check it out in https://eosflare.io Finally, if you want to have a better understanding about EOS RAM and Bandwith check my study here: https://steemit.com/eos/@leordev/eos-ram-and-bandwith-analysis-airdropping-steps-on-junglenet I hope it helps you!


3

What exactly is a single unit of bandwidth, what’s the difference between net and cpu, how do we determine how much bandwidth we need to perform an action, and how is it priced with demand? Bandwidth is made up of CPU and NET. CPU is computing time measured in microseconds, and NET is data storage measured in bytes. You need NET according to how much space ...


2

The unstake command will become available after at least 15% of the total token holders vote on the chain. Right now, were almost at 7% (https://eosauthority.com/voting), so no one can unstake their tokens. Thomas Cox elaborates on this in his post Magic 15%. "And even after we hit 15% and the “unstake” command becomes available, it takes three days ...


2

Just a quick shot: Search for blocked/still available names and namespaces like it's done when buying an domain online Cost calculator for creating an account


2

Great idea, I would love to use that. If you need any help, I may use some spare time to participate. in addition to 5. voting: stats for BPs (e.g. how long have they have been active as BP, missed DPoS turns etc.) history of voting for freezing accounts, change account code, protocol/constitution changes 8) When added to EOSIO, information about EOS ...


2

How does the protocol prevent bandwidth holders (EOS holders)from concentrating too much and make the platform unattractive for small users If I am not mistaken, if a particular EOS holder do not use bandwidth, this bandwidth is available for another users. So if a big token holder would like to spam the network, actually he can. If he owns 1% of the tokens,...


2

If you want to log events on chain, you can use the demux-js library on the eosio repo to listen to chain events. From here, you can store that data as it updates in your database of choice.


1

You are not charged for any RPC getter API calls. If you're not forced to sign the transaction, then there's no way to know which account to charge. You're charged if you're changing state or pushing data to the chain.


1

Voting requires Staked tokens and when voting is ended, you will be able to unstake them. However, Staked tokens require a 3-day liquidation.


1

To perform any transaction in EOS, you need net and CPU bandwidth. It is not possible to decide who pays for CPU. It is possible in the case of RAM. RAM cost is imposed to who pays for storing app data in RAM. If a contract calls inline or deferred another contract, then the caller(ie. caller contract account) must have the required amount of CPU bandwidth ...


1

As mentioned above the proposed constitutional article will limit each entity to a maximum of 10% ownership of EOS. Entities with more can be subject to arbitration. Another key component to minimizing consolidation of the EOS token supply is in the game theory behind the initial distribution of ERC-20 EOS. By stretching the distribution out over a whole ...


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