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34

While there is limited information on dApp stack, here's what I found on the internet so far while we wait for more. 🔗 Find the updated version of the compilation here 🔗 🎬 Youtube Channels nsjames Setting up a Virtual Machine and EOSIO for smart contract development Basic EOSIO smart contract schema, structs, actions and persisting to the blockchain ...


17

You can check out the Scatter Demos page which has both C++ contracts and a javascript front-end integrated with eosjs and Scatter. It was also just updated to match master branch for EOSIO as of 5-9-2018 http://demos.scatter-eos.com And the code for it (including the invaders contract) here: https://github.com/EOSEssentials/Scatter-Demos


12

I'm writing here the contracts that helped me the most and the guides that I'm aware. nsjames youtube series: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_0j3NAYVBiyY152K0f-2og Kevin Heifner, Webinar from OCI, one of the main EOS committers: https://objectcomputing.com/resources/events/webinars/building-apps-with-eos/webinar-recording - the bonus here is that he ...


11

eosiocpp currently compiles contracts using c++14. cib compiles contracts using the c++17 language, but c++14 library. sandboxing: contracts are compiled to WASM. Normal OS functions (filesystem, threading, etc.) are not available. Note: cib requires an up-to-date Firefox (fastest) or Chrome (slow loading).


9

There is a new active project trying to adapt the EOSIO API to TypeScript using AssemblyScript called eos-typescript. They have a telegram group. I think TS is easier to mantain and read and will definitely reduce the barrier of entry and attract more dapp developers. Compilation from TypeScript to webassembly is very efficient and plenty performant for ...


9

The first line of token::create is require_auth( _self );. So I think only the contract account eosio.token can create the tokens. What you can always do is to reutilize this contract in an account that belongs to you: cleos set contract your.account $EOSPATH/build/contracts/eosio.token So you have control of all the features and can create all the tokens ...


9

Well, it is certainly possible. The contract would have to be rewritten into C++ because Solidity (Ethereum's native programming language) is not supported by the Eosio software. Traditional software development tools could be used to port the code over to C++ and then it would be compiled into wasm (Web Assembly) in order to be executed by the Eosio ...


7

Youtube guide for creating and interacting with smart contracts for dawn 3.0, it doesn't include a web interface but seems quite in-depth otherwise with 3 videos available in the series. Non-video guide for creating smart contracts, multi-part, as of this posting the guide is not yet complete with only 2 entries. The guide claims to be end-to-end so they ...


6

I suggest you look into NectarJS, it allows you to compile JS into many different native scripts, including WASM. While I've not used it myself, it appears to be as simple as nectar --target wasm file.js


5

If I understood everything correctly: A transaction stores multiple actions. Transactions are stored in blocks. Every block producer has its turn (approx. 0.5 sec for this DPOS) to create a block and execute the corresponding transactions including their actions deterministically. If there would be concurrent write access of multiple block producers to the ...


5

This is handled through staking and rate limiting. In order to have a functioning Dapp you need to stake tokens (RAM, CPU and bandwidth). These buy you a percentage of the resources on the chain. If you use to much your transactions will not go through. The section on resource limits here gives a good primer - https://medium.com/eosio/introducing-eos-io-...


5

It should be possible now! All that a person would have to do is create a wrapper around the C/C++ API created by EOSIO. Once that wrapper is created, the code would then be compiled to wasm and uploaded to the blockchain as normal.


5

At the moment you would have to port solidity code (ETH) to C++ (EOS). In the future EOS will support the Ethereum virtual machine so it could be possible to use existing solidity codebases with minimal changes. From an earlier version of the EOS whitepaper: Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM) This virtual machine has been used for most existing smart ...


5

Users of the EOS network will not require any holdings to interface with dApps. As you mentioned Airdrops are certainly a benefit of owning EOS, many companies are using this as a way to circumvent the ICO restrictions by the SEC and also by the large tech companies banning ICO advertisements. Once the Everipedia airdrops ends, there will be more, ...


5

I made some example code that includes a simple smart contract and a web interface. There is a simple html/js/jquery version of the interface and a react version here on github


5

Here is one counter-argument. A side chain needs resources, namely block producers, voters, and incentives for all of them to act. A block producer that's voted in for the main chain might not be interested to support a side chain. The majority of voters might not care for a side chain. If, on the other hand, the side chain is supposed to run with only ...


5

Yes, you can fork EOS for this. Think of EOS as an inherently flexible operating system layer for blockchain based applications. If you look at the chain config.hpp file, you can see some of the basic flexibility you can change for your own needs.: Example changing block interval: const static int block_interval_ms = 500; // half second blocks Here ...


4

EOS Bandwidth in most cases refers to operations which writes to blockchain. So if you would like to perform any operation, which will cause that some new data will saved into blockchain, then you will need to have some bandwidth left, to perform such operation. i mean - no. of simultaneous users fetching the EOS blockchain data. Fetching data is another ...


4

dApp's generating their own private keys for each user is not a viable strategy. Users won't want to hold many of the keys as it's stressful and are objectively harder to memorize than a typical username/password combination. A more likely future to the above - but by no means a good solution - would be for users to generate a new public/private key for all ...


4

You can do TypeScript also, here's an example https://steemit.com/eosio/@eosargentina/developing-typescript-javascript-on-eos


3

On a recent Epicenter episode I heard Karl Floersch of the Ethereum Foundation was planning on teaching an intro to cryptoeconomics course. Depending on what material he decides to cover in the course it might be useful for what you're trying to achieve. There is also the slockit and DAO source code, which you could study to learn the basics. While the ...


3

You can view the eosdactoken contract here - https://github.com/eosdac/eosdactoken We've implemented some extra functions for membership which will tie into our forthcoming DAC voting and worker proposal contracts.


3

You'll be able to create contracts with all sorts of languages, perhaps even Siri could make you one. However, this is found on the EOS Wiki "Other toolchains in development by 3rd parties include: Rust, Python, and Solidity. While these other languages might appear simpler, their performance will likely impact the scale of application you can build. We ...


3

In theory, Twitter could move all their data to EOS, using the blockchain purely as a replacement for their cloud services. They have just signed a contract with Amazon Web Services to do just this, so it is unlikely they will be moving to EOS anytime soon. However if they did, the move would be invisible to their users, who would not even realise they had ...


2

Updated answer: Currently EOS smart contracts are written in C++17. For more details see the official SDK, CDT (Contract Development Toolkit) which is based on clang 7.


2

There could be benefits yes, depending on which dApps a user might interact with. It might be possible that a dApp will require a user to stake tokens to the dApp to power it, and/or for storage, either for access, or to gain access to additional features/capacity. This will depend on the business model a particular dApp chooses to adopt of course, and ...


2

Sidechaining is any mechanism that allows tokens from one blockchain to be securely used within a completely separate blockchain but still moved back to the original chain if necessary. By convention the original chain is normally referred to as the "main chain", while any additional blockchains which allow users to transact within them in the tokens of the ...


2

Many Chinese projects airdropped their tokens to users and they had no jurisdictional repercussions because it was distributed freely and everyone had same chances to get them. If the token got value it is mainly because users agree to give it value. Just precise the function of your token in the whitepaper and make it clear that is had no actual value. ...


2

The eosio.token contract is indeed for the public to create tokens on, similar to ERC20 on Ethereum however instead of a contract for each token, many tokens can be based all on this one eosio.token contract. Part of the eosio.system contracts README.md is as follows... "This contract enables users to stake tokens, and then configure and vote on ...


2

I've gathered links to help you develop DApp. Developer Portal and ... https://developers.eos.io/ https://www.eosdocs.io/ https://github.com/EOSIO/eos/wiki https://github.com/EOSIO/Documentation Articles EOS 101: Getting started with EOS https://hackernoon.com/eos-101-getting-started-with-eos-part-1-ab0324c233e0 https://hackernoon.com/eos-101-...


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