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9

The account history plugin has changed the name to history_api_plugin - use this one instead of what you currently have


8

You can find the api endpoint for any BP by querying their bp.json file. The bp.json file has information about the BP publishing it, and among other things it has a key called api_endpoint which is what you need. Every BP should publish their bp.json on their url - copy the web link for the BP you want from http://eosnetworkmonitor.io/ and append /bp....


7

Blocks always need to be produced due to there always being the potential for an action to be sent to the chain. If blocks are not produced, that action would then have additional latency added to it for the time it would take the chain to start and produce a block for one action. Also, if the chain is not flowing, there would not be a mechanism for ...


6

Please feel free to edit this question for any fix or enhancement. Your contribution is valuable especially that EOS and its resources are frequently updated and this answer will need to be updated accordingly. Suggested Topology The front-end can be configured as a set of non-producing nodes to serve as a cluster. Those nodes should be the ones ...


6

For some examples, you can check the sizes of the wasm files in EOSIO contracts (sizes are approximate): $ ls -l eos/build/contracts/* | grep wasm | awk 'BEGIN {print "SIZE \t NAME"} {sum+= $5; n++; print $5/100"KB " $NF} END {print "average: " sum/n/100"KB"}' SIZE NAME 44.05KB asserter.wasm 345.34KB dice.wasm 59.9KB eosio.bios.wasm 217.36KB eosio.msig....


6

There is an article in the documentation detailing how you can setup and run a network with multiple producers, voting, and resource consumption. Excerpt: In this tutorial, we will start a number of nodeos nodes, point them to each other, and eventually vote on a set of producers. All of the nodeos nodes will run on the same server. In the following ...


5

Both net_plugin and bnet_plugin are responsible of to the Peer-to-Peer network. The P2P network is the network that is between the Block Producers. However, net_plugin is the old plugin for the P2P network. Whereas, the bnet_plugin is a newer and optional protocol plugin that works side-by-side with the existing net_plugin. But, a bnet_plugin only ...


5

I solved it. The problem was that I was using .wast and you can no longer use .wast you have to use .wasm


5

From a paid standby block producer: https://eosnode.tools/blocks The eosnode.tools is now discontinued. Try https://snapshots.eosnation.io/.


4

You can try CLion which is not free, but I found it very useful. You can use any other C++ IDE like Code::Blocks. The important part is that EOSIO is using CMake to build the project (it's like Maven / Gradle for Java or npm for Node.js) which should be integrated in most of the IDEs. In terms of testing I guess you can use actually eosjs and assert the ...


4

You can run nodeos in the background. (add '&' at the end of command line) $ nodeos & And if you don't want to see messages from nodeos, then use following command. $ nohup nodeos > /dev/null 2>&1 &


4

chain_id is a hash of the fields in genesis.json. Change any field to get a different id.


4

pkill nodeos or just kill <PID> where pid is nodeos's pid. basically do not do: kill -9 <PID>


4

I don't know if they are doing that, but what you could do is create a program that reads all blocks from start_block var: Read block start_block Check if this block has transactions If yes, save the transactions in your database Increment start_block Go back to step 1 and keep doing that till you are in the head block Or, I already did it for you, just ...


4

From the code: /** * @class fork_database * @brief manages light-weight state for all potential unconfirmed forks * * As new blocks are received, they are pushed into the fork database. The fork * database tracks the longest chain and the last irreversible block number. All * blocks older than the last irreversible block are freed ...


4

Yes there is IDE for eosio you can try to this IDE https://www.eosstudio.io/


4

You can use these 2 sites. I personally used the eossweden one http://snapshots.eossweden.org/ https://snapshots.eosnation.io/


4

Can you call the below to activate ACTION_RETURN_VALUE cleos push action eosio activate '["c3a6138c5061cf291310887c0b5c71fcaffeab90d5deb50d3b9e687cead45071"]' It looks like you called activate with the description_digest and not the feature_digest. curl -X POST http://localhost:8888/v1/producer/get_supported_protocol_features | jq -r ... { ...


3

This can be done in 2 steps: 1. Find the latest block This can be done using the get_info() end-point. Example: $ curl http://publicapi-mainnet.eosauthority.com/v1/chain/get_info and save head_block_id (e.g. 0064aed8bf489f860ea6897f36fcd0ca3d60c0364479afc6259e7262d7bd200b) 2. Check the header of the latest block curl --request POST \ --...


3

Each network has a genesis.json file. Start nodeos with that file and with --p2p-peer-address set to 1 or more nodes on that network.


3

The issue is that the port required by nodeos, port 8888 by default, is already being used by another running process. It's likely that you're running a keosd process, from starting a previous instance of nodeos. If you're on a Mac, you can find existing keosd processes using... $ ps -ax | grep keosd And then kill any running keosd processes using... $ ...


3

Query your account name by publick key cleos -u https://mainnet.meet.one get accounts *publick_key* Query your balance by account name cleos -u https://mainnet.meet.one get currency balance eosio.token *account_name* Query your account info(CPU/NET/RAM) by account name cleos -u https://mainnet.meet.one get account *account_name* Query your refunding ...


3

To get transaction history, you need to hit a node that has that filter installed (otherwise you'll get back an empty array). Here's a working curl request (replace accountnamehere with a real account name): curl --request POST \ --url http://api.eosnewyork.io/v1/history/get_actions \ --data '{"account_name":"accountnamehere","pos":0,"offset":200}' Not ...


3

Here's an example of how to deploy to a testnet (assuming you've already set up the wallet and accounts). In this example we'll deploy the hello contract to the helloworld54 account on the CryptoKylin testnet: cd hello/ touch hello.cpp eosiocpp -o hello.wasm hello.cpp eosiocpp -g hello.abi hello.cpp cd .. # deploy cleos -u http://api.kylin.alohaeos.com ...


3

Yes, one BP is enough. $ nodeos --producer-name eosio --enable-stale-production should be enough to start producing blocks on a chain with one node.


3

I found the solution thanks to https://github.com/EOSIO/eos/issues/4771 answer Binaries are installed to /usr/local/eosio/bin in the 1.1 release. You'll need to add that path to your PATH environment variable. This is not expected to continue in future releases. To see why your tests are failing, in your build directory, run ctest --output-on-failure.


3

This looks like a consequence of the incompatibility between EOSIO v.1.1.x and EOSFactory v1.1. EOSFactory v1.1 is compatible only with EOSIO v1.0.8 and v1.0.9, not higher (the assumptions made in the release notes turned out to be over-optimistic).


3

Putting @confused00 's comment and mine together: Question 1: All accounts are unique in one EOS.IO chain (like the mainnet). That is why there are also things like name bidding. This is quite well described here. However an account can be controlled by key-pairs and can have multiple permission levels. So it is possible that multiple entities control an ...


3

You need to use the launcher program. Look for the parameter named: --pnodes This is the parameter that determines the number of block producing nodes in your eosio compatible blockchain. You should probably change other parameters there too so read the whole explanation here: https://github.com/EOSIO/eos/blob/master/testnet.md#the-launcher-application


3

A good way would be to use the demux-js library. It listens for specified actions and allows updating logic for whatever kind of database you like. This is a RAM free option which essentially allows you to achieve CRUD functionality by creating a mirror image of what the blockchain would show if you played through all of your actions. Mind the mess, but ...


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