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An airdrop is a free token distribution while a ICO is a fund offering in exchange of tokens. Everipedia wanted to do a ICO in order to collect funds to finance their project, then Block.One made a deal with the Everipedia team by funding their financial needs and it return they build on EOS and airdrop their tokens to eos token holders.


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Why does it seem that there are hardly any ICO for EOS projects? But there are many AirDrops on EOS? I believe there are a few aspects that led to this phenomenon: Regulatory risk. ICOs have seen quite a bit regulatory scrutiny lately, and selling/advertising securities to (non-accredited) investors can expose you to legal risks, unless you are willing to ...


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Many Chinese projects airdropped their tokens to users and they had no jurisdictional repercussions because it was distributed freely and everyone had same chances to get them. If the token got value it is mainly because users agree to give it value. Just precise the function of your token in the whitepaper and make it clear that is had no actual value. ...


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Airdropping a token distribution to a widely distributed token distribution such as EOS can be beneficial for bootstrapping a project with a community that has an interest in the project. It also allows other projects to take advantage of the anti-consolidation properties of EOS, and achieve a more optimal distribution for their own project.


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The Ethereums that Block.one earned from ICO is literally converted into real cash. They sold it back to really money because that's the whole point of doing ICO, earning funds for further development.


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Your question's got some point. Right, it's a double sided sword that EOS allows a token owner to change the contract and do anything they want, fixing, changing contract, etc afterwards. It's great feat to have such flexibility but it's a problem if you don't have trust on the author of the contract. I don't believe we have access to the code wasm hash ...


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Set all the permissions of the contract account to eosio. Then the contract code will be theoretically not changeable unless the Active BPs vote to change it.


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To answer the second part of the question: The coin issuer raise funds (not make money :) ) by selling chunks of the tokens on exchanges. The price will follow the market supply and demand. Have a look at the everipedia Air Drop, one of the most famous on EOS blockchain.


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As per my knowledge there is limitation in token symbole that you can only use uppercase characters, no numbers are allowed and only 7 characters are allowed as symbol.


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The process works same as on test net with one change that is you need to provide authorization via mainnet account. Producers don't create symbole for your token you need to do it by yourself only as you do it on testnet.


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Non-Fungible Tokens made for this functionality each are unique and mostly used in game where each token is different from another.This functionality is due to uniqness of token, And if you want tot send 50 tokens then you need to enter 50 different uris.And if you don't need to do this then you need to make your own nft contract.


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You have to pass some unique string for every token. For an example if you want to issue 2 token then you need to run this command cleos push action ac_name issue '["ac_name2","2 CCN",["firsttoken","secondtoken"],"This is MEMO"]' -p ac_name Try this.


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Hey that's a great question. I've wondered about that myself as we launched our own Blockchain Platform (carmel.io) and it's not so much about whether you're selling the tokens or not. You could definitely sell Utility Tokens. For example, the EOS token is an utility token and they're selling them. A utility token is essentially a token that can be used for ...


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