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In the current specification, each of the 21 Block Producers will produce 6 seconds worth of blocks (i.e. 12 blocks) before handing off to the next producer in the production order. Irreversibility is not determined by number of blocks, but by the number of producers who build on blocks. The protocol will tell you when a block becomes irreversible. Once ...


5

The EOS constitution forbids to have more than 10% (total supply) eos tokens for one individual/dApp/BlockProducer. This was addressed by Thomas Cox in interview with EOS GO : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQe15JHpjDA


5

Firstly, there are 21 active block producers, not validators. Everyone can be a validator, and anyone can be a candidate or inactive block producer. If the question is why only 21 active BPs, it's a number that Dan Larimer arrived to after some experimentation in his previous projects (BitShares, Graphene, and Steem.) For instance, one of Dan Larimer's ...


3

Last irreversible block (LIB) is the way of providing BFT finality assuming at least 2/3+1 honest producers. However, a single confirmation from a BP is not sufficient proof to contribute to making an irreversible block--this would mean that when the last of the 2/3+1 BPs signs the block, it's immediately irreversible. However, by the time the other (honest) ...


3

In DPoS there are turnwise block creations of every of the (in EOS) 21 block producers. Therefore orphan or stale blocks which are common in PoW chains, do not usually occure. Any misbehaving block producer should theoretically be voted out. The white paper concludes: Under normal conditions a DPOS blockchain does not experience any forks because, rather ...


3

In the current specification, each of the 21 Block Producers will produce 6 seconds worth of blocks (i.e. 12 blocks) before handing off to the next producer in the production order. (see bytemaster's answer below for more details)


2

How does the protocol prevent bandwidth holders (EOS holders)from concentrating too much and make the platform unattractive for small users If I am not mistaken, if a particular EOS holder do not use bandwidth, this bandwidth is available for another users. So if a big token holder would like to spam the network, actually he can. If he owns 1% of the tokens,...


2

Transactions are atomic on EOS and this is done behind the scenes for you. If this wasn't enforced for all transactions on the blockchain, the token would be useless. The code of the EOSIO copies the values of the needed variables to a temporary area and runs the tasks in the transaction. If any validation fails, e.g. not enough funds in an account, the ...


2

The philosophy behind DPoS is that, even though only a small set of nodes (in case of EOS, 21 Active BPs) are elected to produce blocks, every full node keeps an entire copy of block data & state data. So basically: Every full node will validate the incoming blocks, checking signatures for transactions, checking contract execution results, checking if ...


2

Overview If a transaction is introduced in a block that never achieves 2/3+1 confirmations, it means there's likely a fork where at least 1/3 of the BPs are building blocks on. In this case, the blockchain is forked, and the fork with more BPs will be faster and thus will become the longest chain, where honest BPs will build on. Neither of the forks will ...


2

Any event (action) that occurs on an eosio chain is at least a part of a transaction. The transactions are sent to a node that either belongs directly to a block producer, or will be forwarded to one. When sending transactions, resources are used up and can not be reused for 24 hours. These are CPU and NET bandwidth, and possibly RAM. In order to access ...


1

No. Block-hash/digest (SHA-256) changes, when order of transactions changes.


1

Even if it's possible, it wouldn't matter. There's mostly more than one valid block. Fork-db tracks all different valid reversible blocks producers agreed to. Longest Chain wins. That's why it takes some time until a block is irreversible.


1

Apart from the official Technical Whitepaper V2, followings are the few documents which were released even before the EOS mainnet launch:- EOS: an Introduction: This describes about the way to reach DPoS consensus mechanism. EOS Multi-signature: This tells you about how to ensure an account (user or contract) with multi-signature feature. EOS: Explanation ...


1

As per the whitepaper, 15 or more producers have to agree on the 21 BPs that will produce the next 126 blocks (6 blocks for each of the 21 BPs; a round) and form a schedule. To accomplish this, the proposed schedule is introduced in the block header of each block that starts a new round, and, if it's signed by 15+ BPs, it's considered an active schedule and ...


1

I'm assuming by node you mean block producer. If the block producer agrees to pay the voters a share of the block rewards, then yes, a voter will get money. However, it's been my experience in the EOS community that this is frowned upon, as most community members suggest the block producers with the best tech to support the block chain should be voted in, ...


1

The main worry of a single owner running multiple candidacies for multiple BP spots is related to a centralization of the network. While there is no technical way to "ban" a misbehaving candidate, community currently highlights those who are under the suspicion in Telegram chats, community forums, reddit and other mediums. If proven right, candidates risk ...


1

As mentioned above the proposed constitutional article will limit each entity to a maximum of 10% ownership of EOS. Entities with more can be subject to arbitration. Another key component to minimizing consolidation of the EOS token supply is in the game theory behind the initial distribution of ERC-20 EOS. By stretching the distribution out over a whole ...


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